Rohm and Haas Company  Paint and Coatings Materials Available Abstracts and Speakers for 2008

 

 

 

Title:

Role of Mildewcides on Yellow Discoloration of Latex Paints

Abstract:

 

Mildew resistance of interior paints has become a topic of greater interest to paint companies in recent years.  They are constantly evaluating their ‘new and improved’ formulations for various properties including hiding, staining, scrubbing, fading and mildew resistance.  The test methods for measuring these properties typically are established methods such as ASTM test methods.  For evaluating mildew resistance, however, there is always anxiety on which test method to follow for a more realistic assessment of paints.  Methods popularly employed in coatings for testing mildewcidal properties are Military Spec 810F , ASTM D 5590 (Agar Plate method), ASTM D 3273 (Environmental Chamber Method).  Some methods that are similar in principle and not used in coatings industry are ASTM C 1338, ASTM G21, and a test method from Forest Products Laboratories (FP).   We selected several commercially available paints of different grades previously tested by independent lab (s) and evaluated by two agar based methods, the standard ASTM D 5590 and the Forest Products Laboratory method published in 2000.  We report the comparative evaluations of the two methods and attempt to establish a correlation.

 

 

Presenters Bio:

Dr. Lakshmi Sadasivan has significant experience in biocides research and customer support for microbial deterioration problems within the coatings industry (15 years). Worked on all aspects of biodeterioration, example, in-can spoilage, enzyme degradation, dry-film defacements of paints, stains, plastics, wood and consumer products. Experienced in identifying microbial flora in products and surfaces including bacteria, fungi and algae.

 

Active member of the ASTM D-01-28 subcommittee and IBRG (International Biodeterioration Research Group) for Test Methods Development.    

 

 

Postdoctoral research at Rutgers University, Isolated and characterized a novel bacterium producing antifungal compounds which can be used as biocontrol agent on seed dressings for agricultural applications (Patented).

 

Doctoral and postdoctoral experiences include: survival mechanism in bacteria, melanin formation by bacteria as a survival phenomenon, nitrogen fixation by free living bacteria.

 

 

Title:

Green Chemistry and Architectural Coatings

           

Abstract:

A glimpse along the Coatings value chain reveals a growing commitment to the Global good.  The environmental focus continues to evolve from one based on regulations to one that looks more comprehensively at the total impact of materials from cradle to grave or what we call "Lifecycle Thinking."  Going green in Coatings demands a shift in technology!  It is only through innovative design that today’s paints deliver the required performance both in interior and exterior applications while meeting stricter environmental regulations.  This presentation reflects on how specific novel innovations have resulted in greening the US Paint Industry.  Beyond paint performance, we will look at the monomer building blocks and discuss specific initiatives to reduce our carbon footprint. 

 

Bio:

Alvin Lavoie, Ph.D., is Technology Director for Architectural Coatings, Paint and Coatings Materials at Rohm and Haas Company.  During his 26-year career with Rohm and Haas, Dr. Lavoie has held leading positions in research and technology, including Director of Emerging Technology, Director of Toxicology, Director of Central Analytical Support, and Director of Technical Staffing and Training.  He served as Project Leader in Architectural Coatings, Technical Manager in Building Products, and Research Section Manager, Polymer and Resins Synthesis.

 

As a Senior Scientist, Dr. Lavoie developed siloxane crosslinking technology, developed a process to concurrently run a free radical emulsion polymerization and a cationic siloxane polymerization to generate hybrid acrylic-siloxane emulsion polymers, and contributed to the fundamental understanding of the driving forces which lead to specific morphologies in multistage emulsion polymerizations.

 

Dr. Lavoie is a member of the advisory board for the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences at UMBC (University of Maryland Baltimore County) and a member of the American Chemical Society.  He holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from the University of Massachusetts, North Dartmouth.

 

 

 

Title:

Opaque Polymer as a Primary Formulation Ingredient

 

Abstract:

Opaque polymer has been a commercial product for over 25 years and is currently being used in a wide variety of paints and coatings.  Many formulators are using opaque polymer as a standard raw material providing a means to formulating higher performing paints at the lowest cost possible.  Some of the benefits of opaque polymer include key properties such as improved exterior durability, brighter colors and whites, reduced mudcracking in interior flats, and economies in production.  Methods to incorporate opaque polymer in new formulations will be discussed as well as approaches to maximize its benefits.  While opaque polymer was initially introduced as a product which reduces raw material cost by reducing the level of TiO2 required in a formulation, over the years these benefits have provided additional value to paint companies.

 

Presenters Bio:

David Fasano received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Nebraska in 1982.  He joined The Rohm and Haas Company that same year.  During his 25 year career he has developed and supported products for the Paint, Coatings, and Building Industries as well as Personal Care Products.  He holds 5 U.S. patents in these areas.  He has held numerous positions in the laboratory and research management across these markets. 

 

 

 

Title:

            The New Do-it-Yourself “Painter”:  The Contradictory Consumer

 

Abstract:

Understanding the changing needs and desires of the paint consumer is a challenge.  What motivates and attracts this dynamic audience and how best do manufacturers communicate to them?  Learn about the contradictions this new consumer brings to the paint community and experience the services that inspire painting. 

 

Presenters Bio:

            Debbie Zimmer, Director of PQI Communications and Media Relations in North America, is on the cutting edge of the latest interior painting trends such as color, decorative techniques, gloss levels and quality issues. Debbie combines her knowledge of paint chemistry and her talent for decorating to educate homeowners on how and why to use quality paints and coatings when decorating the interior of their homes. Today, as part of the Paint Quality Institute’s public information program, Debbie travels the country appearing on television shows and conducting seminars for magazine editors and newspaper feature writers. 

 

She is a member of the Color Marketing Group, the Home Comfort Council and was recently named as one of the top five industry influencers in American Painting Contractor’s “Who’s Who in the Painting Industry”. 

 

 

 

Title:    

Formulating for the VOC Compliant Architectural Paint Market

 

Abstract: 

For over half a century, Rohm and Haas has developed emulsion polymers with excellent exterior durability.  Architectural coatings properties such as cracking, gloss, tint retention, and dirt pick up resistance have been achieved using acrylic technologies.  With low VOC being mandated across North America, and globally, it has become more challenging to optimize all of the key performance properties required by paint companies.  This presentation entails a historical overview of dirt pick-up resistance at our exposure fences, some of the analytical tools for assessing and predicting dirt pick-up, the challenge of predictive/quick lab tests, and some of the available technical approaches for achieving improved dirt pickup resistance.  We will also give an update on how some of our newest technology for low VOC is performing to date.

 

 

 

 

Presenters Bio:

Linda Adamson received her B.S. degree in Chemistry from Philadelphia College of Textile & Sciences, now known as Philadelphia University.  She has worked for Rohm & Haas for over 27 years at the Research facility in Springhouse, Pa.  From 1980-1996, she worked in the Architectural Coatings Research department, primarily focusing on projects related to binder technology and development.  In 1996 she transferred to the Coatings Technical Service Department, where she primarily supported new Semigloss binders for the interior and exterior marketplace.  Her current responsibility in the Paint and Coatings Material Group is to lead the applications effort for Technical Service for Architectural Wall Coatings and Masonry market segments along with Research and Development projects for the Low VOC Market.

 

 

Mr. Arthur A. Leman is currently Technical Manager of Coatings Sales Technical Service in North America. He has been with Rohm and Haas for the past 15 years in a variety of roles including Asia-Pacific Technical Director for Coatings from 1997-2001. Prior to joining Rohm and Haas, Mr. Leman was Laboratory Manager for Cabot Stains, Inc. He holds a M.S. in Plastics Engineering from the University of Massachusetts where he also taught a graduate level course in Color Science. He is also a past-Chairman of the ASTM Committee on Architectural Coatings.

 

 

 

 

Title:

Deck Stains:  Understanding and Meeting the Needs of the New Decking Market

 

Abstract:

The changing decking market offers new products to consumers and new challenges to coatings manufacturers.  The voluntary phase out of CCA treated wood for residential applications at the end of 2003, opened up the decking market to new wood treatments that are environmental friendly and composite decking materials, usually composed of wood fibers and recycled plastics. The composite decking market is continuing to grow becoming more popular due to the advantages over wood decking materials. Rohm and Haas Company has been  asked to provide resin materials for use in solid color deck stains with proven performance over composite decking materials.  Analytical and laboratory testing have resulted in a better understanding of the compositions of these new materials and Rohm and Haas Company has identified possible future resin candidates for products designed to coat the composite decking materials.

 

Presenters Bio:

Shelly Fox received her Bachelors of Science degree in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.  In 1998, she joined Rohm and Haas Company’s Technical Service group to work on the development of formulations for architectural gloss, primer, and stain applications.  Her recent work has been focused on coatings for wood plastic composite substrates and understanding the changing decking market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:

Sustainability – What’s the Big Fuss?

 

Abstract:

It is no longer good enough to simply meet the VOC regulations for coating applications. Today, growing public awareness is driving suppliers and manufacturers alike to look along the coatings value chain deliver solutions for the Global good. We will discuss how this opportunity is driving innovation and accelerating new product introductions. We will introduce and discuss concepts such as cradle to grave or what we call "Lifecycle Thinking."  Going green in Coatings demands a shift in technology!  And we will explore this green trend from both the customer perception side as well as the technology/chemistry side.

 

Presenters Bio:

Dr. Stewart Williams joined Rohm and Haas in 1989 in the Analytical division where he headed up their vibrational spectroscopy group. He specialized then in using IR, NIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques in a broad range of research and development applications. In 1992, he joined the Coatings group as an Applications Chemist.

 

Stewart has completed numerous business courses – including training at Kellogg and Wharton School of Business. He has served in major roles in technical management (1997 – 1999), market development (1999-2004), and global product management (2004-2006). 

 

Today, as Technical Director of the Rohm and Haas Paint Quality Institute, Dr. Williams develops and manages PQI’s technical initiatives, including material for the training of painting contractors and paint sales personnel, PQI website content, paint specifier seminars, and other initiatives in support of quality painting.  He brings a rich blend of technical and commercial experience to this role.

 

 

Dr. Williams holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry with Physics from the University of the Virgin Islands and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Washington

 

 

Title: 

Solid Color Deck Stains:  Trends, Substrates and Formulation Study

 

Abstract:

The changing decking market offers new products to consumers and new challenges to coatings manufacturers.  The voluntary phase out of CCA treated wood for residential applications at the end of 2003 opened up the decking market to new wood treatments as well as composite decking materials, usually composed of wood fibers and recycled plastics. Solid color stains which are used to coat these substrates need good adhesion on weathered and unweathered composite substrates, abrasion resistance, stainblocking and exterior durability.    In addition, government  regulations are forcing solid color stains to lower VOC levels and many stains are now formulated from bases with high loadings of universal colorant.  Background information on new decking substrates will be presented along with data from an evaluation of acrylic binders in VOC compliant solid color stain formulations for these substrates.

 

Presenters Bio:

Greg Monaghan received his BA degree in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina and has worked as a formulator for regional and national architectural coatings manufacturers. He joined Rohm and Haas in 1995 as a group leader in Technical Service and has worked on the development of architectural gloss, primer and stain formulations. Over the last year his workgroup has been developing formulations for new architectural binders designed to meet SCAQMD VOC regulations for gloss paints.

 

 

 

 

Title: 

The Application of a New Industrial Maintenance Acrylic Polymer in an Architectural Coating Setting

 

Abstract: 

Rohm and Haas recently developed a new Industrial Maintenance acrylic polymer with improved corrosion resistance and the ability to adhere to a variety of metal and painted substrates.  Although developed for the Industrial Maintenance area, coatings based on this new technology are being evaluated for use in an Architectural application.  This presentation will review our work with this new technology in the architectural area.   

 

Presenters Bio:

Stan Pruskowski  earned his BS from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science and his MS from Villanova University.  He joined Rohm and Haas in 1981 in Industrial Coatings working on coil coatings in the Building Products group.  In 1984, Stan moved into General Industrial Finishing working with solventborne and waterborne coatings.

 

In 1989, Stan joined the Coatings sales service/customer technical service group where he currently is a Sales Service manager. 

 

In 1999, Stan was the recipient of the Otto Haas Award for Technical Excellence.  Stan was also the editor of Waterborne Coatings Technology, a FSCT Coatings Fundamentals publication.


 

 

 

Title:

Optimization of Flow/Sag Balance in HEUR Thickened Latex Paints

 

Abstract:

Low molecular weight, non-ionic associative thickeners have gained wide acceptance as rheology modifiers in architectural coatings.  Hydrophobically modified ethylene oxide urethanes, HEURs, represent one class of these non-ionic associative thickeners.  All HEUR rheology modifier systems can provide enhanced flow and leveling properties upon brushout compared to high molecular weight, non-associative thickeners.   Two different HEUR rheology modifiers, a KU builder and an ICI builder, are commonly used in an all HEUR coating formulation.   The selection of the ICI builder can be critical in obtaining the maximum flow and leveling performance while maintaining acceptable sag resistance.  In this presentation, we show that there is an optimum ICI builder for a given KU builder.   In particular, we theorize that the KU contribution of the ICI builder relative to the KU builder is the key factor in the choice of the ICI builder.  Data from a semi-gloss formulation employing one KU builder with a range of different ICI builders support this theory.

 

Presenters Bio:

Dr. Barrett Bobsein (Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, UC Berkeley, 1981) joined Rohm and Haas soon after earning his degree.  Having worked on binder and hollow sphere pigment technology, he is currently the group leader for Rheology Modifier Research.

 

 

 

 

Title:

Optimizing the Rheology of Waterborne Coatings

 

Abstract:

Waterborne coatings comprise a major portion of the coatings market today.  Many of these formulations achieve their excellent flow and sag characteristics from being thickened with associative rheology modifiers.  One often-used class of such materials is the non-ionic associative thickeners based on polyethylene oxide.  This class can be further categorized into high shear (ICI) and low shear (KU) viscosity builders.  Recent advances in ICI builder design has created products that give improved ICI thickening efficiency paired with a range of KU contributions.  This greater variety of efficient ICI builders presents challenges, such as maintaining syneresis resistance, but it also affords the opportunity to fully optimize the flow/sag balance of the resulting paint.  The loss of KU viscosity upon tinting coatings thickened with current non-ionic KU builders remains as the major impediment to formulating tint bases with this class of associative thickeners.  We will discuss our latest insights around understanding and managing this viscosity stability challenge.

 

Presenters Bio:

 

Carol Zeszotarski received her BS degree in Chemistry from the College of New Jersey in 1993. 

She joined Rohm and Haas Company and spent four years working in the Analytical Chemistry Department.  She has been in the Architectural Coatings department for the last ten years working in various functions including the development and technical support of latex binders, elastomeric wall coatings, and opaque polymers.  She is currently working in the Rheology Modifiers Research group.

Dr. Barrett Bobsein (Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, UC Berkeley, 1981) joined Rohm and Haas soon after earning his degree.  Having worked on binder and hollow sphere pigment technology, he is currently the group leader for Rheology Modifier Research.

 

 

 

Title:                

Waterborne Clearcoats for Industrial Maintenance

 

Abstract:          

The evaluation of clear waterborne acrylic coatings as topcoats in field-applied protective coating systems will be described.  Clear coatings were evaluated over both waterborne and solventborne systems.  The effect of the clear topcoat on properties such as corrosion resistance, gloss retention, accelerated weathering, dirt resistance, and water blushing resistance will be discussed. 

 

Presenters Bio:

Laura Vielhauer received her B.S. in Chemistry from Ursinus College and is currently a scientist in the technical service group, specializing in waterborne industrial maintenance coatings.  She is a member of ACS, SSPC and FSCT.

 

 

 

Title:

A Novel Approach For Mitigating Viscosity Loss Upon Tinting Aqueous Paints

 

Maintaining the established Stormer KU viscosity of an aqueous paint or coating upon the addition of colorants is often a challenge.  Paints thickened with associative thickeners can show KU viscosity loss after tinting.  For in-plant tinting, the rheology modifier level can be adjusted to account for this viscosity loss.  However, tinting at the point of sale can pose a more difficult problem.  One can try to “overthicken” a tint base in order compensate for the colorant induced viscosity drop, but this leads to handling problems for the tint-base and cannot compensate well across the entire color palette.  We will discuss approaches for improving the tinting process with a viscosity compensator.  This approach can mitigate viscosity drop across colorant loading levels and colorant types in aqueous paints and coatings.

 

Presenters Bio:

Dan Saucy received his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1985.  After a post-doctoral fellowship at Arizona State University, he joined Rohm and Haas Company in 1988.  Dan currently serves as Group Leader-Technical Service for Rheology Modifiers and Dispersants in the Paint and Coatings Materials business of the Rohm and Haas Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:

Formulating Paints for Reduced Viscosity Loss on Tinting

 

Abstract:

The Stormer or KU viscosity is a key performance property of many coatings.  Unfortunately, this viscosity is often strongly influenced by the type and level of colorant used to tint the coating.  When tinting occurs at the point of manufacture, the rheology modifier package can be adjusted to account for the effect of the colorant.  However, when the tinting is done at the point of sale, it presents a challenge to the manufacturer, namely, how to formulate the coating to achieve an acceptably narrow range of final, tinted viscosities for a broad range of color recipes, while delivering all the other performance attributes of the coating.  We will discuss several approaches, both new and established, to achieving this goal, as well as the mechanisms by which these approaches function.

 

Presenters Bio:

Dan Saucy received his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1985.  After a post-doctoral fellowship at Arizona State University, he joined Rohm and Haas Company in 1988.  Dan currently serves as Group Leader-Technical Service for Rheology Modifiers and Dispersants in the Paint and Coatings Materials business of the Rohm and Haas Company

 

 

 

 

 

Title:

A Global View of the Architectural Paint Market

 

Abstract:

While the global expectations of paint – to protect and decorate –remain somewhat similar, many drivers dictate price and quality points. So what drives new product innovation in regions across the globe? Are their universal trends in new product offerings? We will address the face of top quality paint in all regions. To begin, environmental conditions and varying substrates drive the selection of key components to make a desirable paint. The alignment of technology with consumer buying behavior and other external drivers is critical. On the technology side, we will show how specific exterior and interior exposure tests are designed and conducted in various geographies to drive targeted improvements. We will review some of the key factors influencing consumer paint buying decisions. And finally we will demonstrate how to these trends are impacting the choice of chemistries used in architectural coatings.

 

Presenters Bio:

Dr. Stewart Williams joined Rohm and Haas in 1989 in the Analytical division where he headed up their vibrational spectroscopy group. He specialized then in using IR, NIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques in a broad range of research and development applications. In 1992, he joined the Coatings group as an Applications Chemist.

 

Stewart has completed numerous business courses – including training at Kellogg and Wharton School of Business. He has served in major roles in technical management (1997 – 1999), market development (1999-2004), and global product management (2004-2006). 

 

Today, as Technical Director of the Rohm and Haas Paint Quality Institute, Dr. Williams develops and manages PQI’s technical initiatives, including material for the training of painting contractors and paint sales personnel, PQI website content, paint specifier seminars, and other initiatives in support of quality painting.  He brings a rich blend of technical and commercial experience to this role.

 

 

Dr. Williams holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry with Physics from the University of the Virgin Islands and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Washington

 

 

Debbie Zimmer, Director of PQI Communications and Media Relations in North America, is on the cutting edge of the latest interior painting trends such as color, decorative techniques, gloss levels and quality issues. Debbie combines her knowledge of paint chemistry and her talent for decorating to educate homeowners on how and why to use quality paints and coatings when decorating the interior of their homes. Today, as part of the Paint Quality Institute’s public information program, Debbie travels the country appearing on television shows and conducting seminars for magazine editors and newspaper feature writers. 

 

She is a member of the Color Marketing Group, the Home Comfort Council and was recently named as one of the top five industry influencers in American Painting Contractor’s “Who’s Who in the Painting Industry”. 

 

 

 

Title:

            Changing Design, Color and Demographic Trends

 

Abstract:

Changing demographics and design trends influence the homes and buildings we reside or work in.   How will these trends affect products and services developed and formulated for tomorrows home?   

 

Presenters Bio:

Debbie Zimmer, Director of PQI Communications and Media Relations in North America, is on the cutting edge of the latest interior painting trends such as color, decorative techniques, gloss levels and quality issues. Debbie combines her knowledge of paint chemistry and her talent for decorating to educate homeowners on how and why to use quality paints and coatings when decorating the interior of their homes. Today, as part of the Paint Quality Institute’s public information program, Debbie travels the country appearing on television shows and conducting seminars for magazine editors and newspaper feature writers. 

 

She is a member of the Color Marketing Group, the Home Comfort Council and was recently named as one of the top industry influencers in American Painting Contractor’s “Who’s Who in the Painting Industry”. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:

Waterborne Pavement Markings:  The Low VOC Option

 

 

Abstract:

Traffic paint, typically covered with partially embedded glass beads, marks major roadways with lines that are clearly visible both day and night.  Traditionally, solvent based paints offered the consistent fast dry and early washout resistance that pavement marking applications demand.  Beginning in the 1990s, however, safer and lower VOC waterborne paints were developed that exceeded the performance of solvent based traffic markings, provided they were applied at temperatures above 50°F.  The polymer binder technology breakthrough was a pH triggered quick set that made waterborne traffic paints a commercially viable replacement for solvent based paints.  This technology enabled faster dry and resistance to early rain showers, even under high humidity and low air flow conditions.  Recently, polymer binder technology has advanced to enable extension of the waterborne striping season to temperatures nearing 32°F, which virtually eliminates the need for more dangerous, polluting solvent based traffic paints. Properties of superior traffic paints will be addressed, along with a brief review of the improvements that have allowed waterborne paints to perform well under even marginal application conditions.  Waterborne traffic paints containing recently developed binders for low temperature applications will be emphasized.

 

Presenters Bio:

Dr. Kim Kosto earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1999.  She continued her studies in chemical engineering in Prof. William Deen’s group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she received a Ph.D. in May 2004.  Following her studies at MIT, Dr. Kosto joined the Rohm and Haas Company at their Spring House, PA Technical Center.  She is currently working in Paint and Coating Materials Research, specifically on traffic marking applications. 

 

 

Title:

Innovation in Waterborne Traffic Markings

 

Abstract:

This presentation covers a historical review of Rohm and Haas technology development  for the traffic markings industry, the current toolbox available to paint applicators and specifiers, as well as an introduction of technology for low temperature applications.   Included in this presentation are current market trends such as wet night visibility, and a “thinking outside the box” section where barrier & guardrail painting, refreshing/primer for thermo, biocide paint, and grind & grooving can be discussed.     

 

Presenters Bio:

Ms. Cindy Randazzo has a BS in Chemistry from St. Joseph’s University, Phila. PA. She has over 20 years experience in the Architectural and Functional Coatings business, and has worked extensively in supporting new technology within the Traffic Paint area. In this role, Ms. Randazzo provides technical support to paint manufacturing customers, Departments of Transportation and other agencies supporting road marking. Another aspect of her job includes coordination and design for our roadway test deck application program, in support of our Traffic Paint Research group. She is an active member of ATSSA and an advocate for “Wider Lines” for safer roadways. In addition, Ms. Randazzo is a contributing editor for our “The Road Forward” newsletter, which highlights industry trends, safety and technical reviews for the traffic road marking industry.

 

Title:

Accelerated Lab DPUR Testing:  Variables and Correlation with Exterior Exposure

 

Abstract:

Researchers at Rohm and Haas Company have taken a look at variables involved in accelerated dirt pickup resistance (DPUR) testing and at the correlation of accelerated testing with exterior exposure of paint.  Thirty two all acrylic semi-gloss paints were subjected to a variety of lab DPUR tests to answer three questions:  1) How do different variables in an accelerated test change the response of DPUR?  2) Is there a correlation between the lab DPUR test and exterior exposure results?  3) Do certain variables correlate better with exterior results? The goal of this work was to understand accelerated testing and recommend a procedure for accelerated testing that provide the best correlation with exterior exposure.

 

Presenters Bio

Dr. Heather Eckenrode-Stiffler earned her B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown in 1998.  She then attended the University of Pennsylvania where she received her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry.  After completing a post-doctoral fellowship at DuPont Marshall Laboratory, she joined Rohm and Haas Company in 2005.  Her initial work focused on exterior durability (specifically dirt pickup) of architectural paints.  She is currently working with rheology modifiers in Specialty Materials Process Technology

 

 

 

Title:

Technology for Low VOC Coatings

 

Abstract: 

Rohm and Haas has been a leader for many years in the development of binders for formulating low VOC paints.  However, as government regulations are now driving paint manufacturers to develop commercial paints that meet these regulations, there is an increased awareness and demand for performance of these coatings.  We will discuss the latest VOC regulations in North America, the impact of formulating for the low VOC market, and the technological approaches we have used to develop high performance binders and coatings for the low VOC marketplace.

 

Presenters Bio:

Ruth Hook holds a B.A. in Chemistry and English from Oberlin College and an M.S. in Polymer Science and Engineering from Lehigh University.  In 2000, she joined Rohm and Haas as an applications chemist in Architectural Coatings Technical Service.  She currently works in Paint and Coatings Materials, Architectural Coatings Research, developing new products and starting point formulations for architectural applications.  She has a broad range of experience with interior and exterior wall coatings, as well as technical service expertise regarding many new low VOC materials now on the market.  She is based at Rohm and Haas’ Spring House Technical Center in Pennsylvania.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:

            Green Chemistry in Coatings

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

 

 

 

Presenters Bio:

During a 20 year career, Ken held multiple roles in Research and Marketing.  Starting as a senior scientist in Analytical Research in 1985, he managed Research groups in Analytical and Coatings before serving for 5 years in Marketing in Coatings.  He returned to Research in 2003.  His current assignment is Global Technology Manager, Additives.  Ken received his PhD from the University of Bristol, England in 1981.

 

 

 

 

Title:

Developments in Waterborne Acrylic Resins for Low VOC Industrial Maintenance Coatings

 

 

Abstract:

Environmental regulations, in particular those requiring the use of lower VOC coating systems, continue to place pressure on both the manufacturers and end-users of both architectural and industrial coatings.  Resin suppliers are also challenged with the need to design binders which allow lower VOC levels while also maintaining the expected high performance of traditional systems.  This paper will discuss the development of two waterborne acrylic polymers for use in high performance, VOC-compliant coatings for industrial maintenance painting.  The first resin is designed for direct-to-metal coatings with VOC levels under 100 g/L, and is suitable for field and shop-applied coatings for structural steel.  The second is an elastomeric acrylic designed for use in thick film, surface-tolerant coatings for steel and concrete structures, and provides VOC levels well below 50 g/L.  Formulations and coating properties will be described, along with comparisons to traditional, higher VOC waterborne and solventborne coatings.

 

 

Presenters Bio:

Dr. Leo J. Procopio received his Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania.   He joined Rohm and Haas Company at their Spring House, PA research laboratories in 1991 as a Senior Scientist in their Industrial Coatings group, where he was initially involved in new product development of waterborne acrylic latex coatings for concrete substrates.   He has spent the last 12 years carrying out exploratory research, new product development and technical service work in the area of waterborne coatings for the industrial maintenance and factory finishing markets.  He is currently a Technical Service Group Leader in the Paint and Coatings Materials business at Rohm and Haas.  He is a member of the ACS, FSCT, and SSPC, and chairs the SSPC committee C.1.4.c on Waterborne Acrylic Coatings.

 

Title:

High Performance Acrylic Sealant for Tilt-Up Applications

 

Abstract:

Despite the fact that many high performance acrylic sealants are on the market, few are used in exterior moving joints in commercial construction.  One of the reasons for this is a general lack of knowledge about acrylic sealants and how they compare to sealants based on alternative chemistries.  Another is the lack of performance history of high performance acrylic sealants in commercial construction applications.  To begin to fill these voids, a comprehensive study was undertaken to compare the performance of a high performance acrylic sealant to a commonly used 2 part polyurethane sealant.  The targeted application was in low rise tilt-up construction.

 

The sealants were subjected to a battery of laboratory tests, including the measurement of tensile properties and typical ASTM C-920 specification tests.  Accelerated weathering and durability characteristics of the two sealants were evaluated by exposing sealant plaques in both Xenon-Arc and Fluorescent UV weathering devices.  Durability was also assessed via ASTM C1519-04,  Standard practice for Evaluating Durability of Building Construction Sealants by Laboratory Accelerated Weathering Procedures, which measures joint movement performance after multiple exposure cycles.  Paintability of the sealants, and the appearance of applied coatings after weathering, were assessed by coating the sealants with an elastomeric wall coating and subjecting the assemblies to S45 exterior exposure.  Application characteristics and exterior joint movement performance were monitored during and after professional installation of these sealants in alternating joints in a tilt up warehouse in El Paso, TX.

 

Presenters Bio:

Vicki Demarest graduated with a BS in Materials Science and Engineering from Cornell University and received an MS and PhD—both in acrylic composites--from the Biological Materials program at Northwestern University.  Since joining Rohm and Haas in 1990, Vicki has worked in a variety of building and construction businesses.  Most recently, Vicki has been the Group Leader for Caulks & Sealants, where she has focused on polymer and formulation development and on product troubleshooting and testing. 

 

 

 

 

 

Title:    

Formulating 50 VOC Gloss Floor Paints

 

Abstract:

SCAQMD requirements the gloss floor paints be at 50 VOC mean that solvent based urethane alkyds and 200 VOC latex gloss floor paints will need to be reformulated for sale in the Los Angeles area.  Although there are now many binders offered for 50 VOC gloss trim paints, gloss floor paints require a different balance of properties. Of particular importance is that the paint should coalesce at low cosolvent levels but still be hard enough that it doesn’t pick up dirt or scuff easily under foot traffic or light industrial use.  A novel accelerated wear testing machine was used to screen binder chemistries for gloss floor paints.  A 50 VOC paint based on a combination of a water based ambient temperature crosslinking polymer with a water dispersible oil modified urethane has been found to give performance equal to commercial solvent based urethane alkyds and commercial 200 VOC water based gloss floor paints. 

 

Presenters Bio:

Greg Monaghan received his BA degree in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina and has worked as a formulator for both regional and national architectural coatings manufacturers.  He joined Rohm and Haas in 1995 as a group leader in Technical Service and has worked on the development of architectural gloss, primer and stain formulations.  Over the last year, his group has been developing formulations specifically to meet new California VOC regulations for gloss paints.

 

 

Title:    
           
The Causes and Behaviors of Odor in Latex Paint Formulations

 

 

Abstract:

This paper describes studies conducted to determine the relationship between the odor of architectural paint formulations in their storage container, which we have termed in-can odor, and their odor persistence after application.  The possible causes of these odors and their relationship to the paints VOC’s were also investigated.  Odor evaluations were conducted using established test procedures. Results of these tests reveal the odor benefits obtained with the use of solvent free binders along with the discovery that a correlation between the odor of the paint in its storage container and its odor persistence after application cannot be assumed.  The odor of a paint in its storage container is strongly influenced by low levels of highly-volatile, odoriferous compounds. These trace compounds do not appear however, to contribute significantly to the odor persistence of the paint after application. Odor persistence is most influenced by the presence of high levels of slow evaporating components such as coalescing agents and solvents from other raw materials.  In addition to the investigative work described above we present odor test results of various commercial low-odor, flat, latex paints. These data provide a benchmark as to the current state of the low-odor paint market and their relation to low VOC levels

 

 

Presenters Bio:

Paul Doll obtained his B.S. degree from the Rochester Institute of Technology in NY.  The past 15 years he has developed cutting edge inks and coatings.  He holds several patents and was a technical contributor for two reference books.  He joined Rohm and Haas Company in 2005 and currently serves as a Senior Chemist in the Paints and Coatings Materials business.

 

 

Title:

Low VOC Coatings – Technology and Formulating for Maintaining Key Performance Properties


Abstract: 


Rohm and Haas ongoing research and development efforts continue to address the needs of the Coatings Industry for the pending VOC regulations across the United States.  Our R&D efforts, along with our Technical Service work, focuses on both new binder development and on low VOC formulating techniques. This presentation will give a brief overview of some of our key findings, along with emphasizing the importance of maintaining both key interior and exterior properties critical in the marketplace.

 

Presenters Bio:

Linda Adamson received her B.S. degree in Chemistry from Philadelphia College of Textile & Sciences, now known as Philadelphia University.  She has worked for Rohm & Haas for over 27 years at the Research facility in Springhouse, Pa.  From 1980-1996, she worked in the Architectural Coatings Research department, primarily focusing on projects related to binder technology and development.  In 1996 she transferred to the Coatings Technical Service Department, where she primarily supported new Semigloss binders for the interior and exterior marketplace.  Her current responsibility in the Paint and Coatings Material Group is to lead the applications effort for Technical Service for Architectural Wall Coatings and Masonry market segments along with Research and Development projects for the Low VOC Market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Rohm and Haas Contact Information:

Debbie Zimmer

dzimmer@rohmhaas.com

215-619-1407